In an attempt to clean up its platform, the social media giant Twitter has suspended over 70 million bots over the last two months, according to The Washington Post.

This purge of fake profiles and bots is part of Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s attempts to “increase the collective health, openness, and civility of public conversation, and to hold ourselves publicly accountable towards progress.”

The marketing fraternity has welcomed Twitter’s attempt to create a healthy platform. Keith Weed, CMO, Unilever, applauded Twitter’s crackdown on fake accounts. Expressing his support, Weed tweeted, “Pleased to see @twitter taking a big stand against the fake followers polluting the digital ecosystem. Great step forward which strengthens the industry – I hope to see more following.”

With vanity metrics out of the picture, brands have very little to gain from Twitter. In fact, some digital media buyers said the platform has been losing the support of brands who see better reach and engagement on other social media platforms. Sending a strong message to influencers who buy followers, Weed recently said that Unilever will cut ties with influencers who have fake social media followers. It was a clarion call not just for influencers but to all those who have been fuelling the ‘bot economy’.

What Next?
The answer is unanimous – verify all users, giving them the blue tick of approval.

Jyoti Kumar Bansal, CEO India, PHD, says, “With the ecosystem evolving at the pace that it is, there will always be challenges. It is important for us to work with publishers and clients to ensure that our brand goals are at the centre stage of what we do, and that the brands’ equity and visibility is in the right context and environment. I am sure we will see actions that will allow brands to connect with consumers in a meaningful manner, as the social media space is here to stay. Marketing technology will also play a strong role in this.”

This article is authored by Venkata Susmita Biswas and published in Exchange4Media.com